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Postpone low cargo density rules till 2003, CIFFA demands


CIFFA is protesting IATA’s scheduled October implementation date for new low cargo density rules.

During the latest IATA Cargo Tariff Coordinating Conference at the end of May an amendment to Cargo Resolution 502 was adopted that calls for changes in the density rule from 6000 cubic cm per kilogram to 5000 cubic cm per kilogram. The intended effective date is October 1, 2002.

"The results of these adopted rules were finally published at the end of June, but only to members of the Cargo Tariff Coordinating Conference. It was thus late June when the forwarding industry finally begun to hear rumors of this new tariff rule and only received official confirmation from IATA on July 10!" comments CIFFA in its daily bulletin.

"While FIATA and CIFFA certainly accept the fact that IATA is entitled to amend resolutions, subject to Government approval, we take great exception to the time it took to bring this critical information to the marketplace as well as the haphazard way it was done in," CIFFA says.

It adds that "no due regard was given to the users of air cargo who often have designed their shipping packaging to reflect the current weight/volume ratios and who are now faced with potentially stifling rate increases within a very short time line.

CIFFA says the date hardly allows sufficient time to re-configure packaging designs and related challenges with annual summer shut downs in force and the short time available thereafter until rule implementation.

FIATA has protested officially to IATA about the poor manner with which this issue was handled and the short time line allowed for implementation. CIFFA is also encouraging its members to file similar protests to their preferred international carriers and the Canadian Transportation Agency.

Directions for filing the complaint with the agency can be found at:
http://www.cta.gc.ca/cta-otc2000/faqs/filing_e.html
<http://www.cta.gc.ca/cta-otc2000/faqs/filing_e.html> .

CIFFA is instead proposing postponement of the introduction to mid 2003.